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Graduate Courses Spring 2023

ECON 501 01
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General equilibrium and welfare economics. Allocation involving time. Public sector economics. Uncertainty and the economics of information. Introduction to social choice.
Instructor(s)

Johannes Hörner

  Ph.D., Economics, University of Pennsylvania M.A., Economics, DELTA M.Sc., Management, HEC Johannes Hörner is Professor of Economics, Department of Economics, and Cowles Foundation for Research in Economics, Yale University. He has received his Ph.D. in economics from the University of Pennsylvania in 2000, and has held previous positions at the Kellogg School of Management, Northwestern University (2000–2008). His academic interests range from game theory to the theory of industrial organization. His research has focused on repeated games, dynamic games, and auctions.

Alfred Cowles Professor of Economics and Professor of Management johannes.horner@yale.edu 203-432-5352 https://sites.google.com/site/jo4horner/ Horner Faculty Economic Theory 451 College Street 12612356 /sites/default/files/cv_horner.pdf FAS
Johannes Horner
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999
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Ryota Iijima

Assistant Professor of Economics ryota.iijima@yale.edu 203-432-9607 https://sites.google.com/site/ryotaiijimaecon/ Iijima Faculty Economic Theory 451 College Street, room 307 17131172 /sites/default/files/cv/Ryota_Iijima_CV.pdf FAS By Appointment Only
Research Staff
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999
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999
Location
TRUM87 B120
Term Code
202301
Meeting Times
MW 10.00-11.20
ECON 511 01
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Theories of saving, investment, portfolio choice, and financial markets. Longer-run developments; economic growth, capital accumulation, income distribution.
Instructor(s)

Giuseppe Moscarini

Giuseppe Moscarini is the Philip Golden Bartlett Professor of Economics at Yale University and a Research Associate of the National Bureau of Economic Research, Economics Fluctuations and Growth program, where he co-chairs the working group on the Micro and Macroeconomic Perspectives on the Aggregate Labor Market. He is also Co-Director of the Research Program in Macroeconomics at the Cowles Foundation for Research in Economics. He was previously the Henry Kohn Associate Professor of Economics at Yale University, and a Research Fellow of the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation. He served on the editorial board of several professional journals, as co-Editor of Theoretical Economics and Associate Editor of the Journal of Economic Theory. He has been a regular Visiting Scholar of the research departments at the Federal Reserve Banks of Philadelphia and New York.

Moscarini is a macroeconomist who specializes in the theoretical and empirical analysis of labor markets, specifically of unemployment, wage inequality, worker turnover, and the business cycle performance of large and small firms. He has also written extensively on pricing and monetary policy, as well as on the economics of information. His recent research focuses on measurement of labor market flows in the US, specifically recalls of laid off workers and employer-to-employer transitions; he estimated time series of both types of turnover, that he continuously updates and makes available to researchers on his website. His ongoing research investigates the link between labor market mismatch and wage inflation; he proposes and estimates a new Phillips curve, where labor market flows help predict wage and price pressure above and beyond the canonical rate of unemployment.

Ph.D., Economics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1996
Laurea in Economia e Commercio, Università degli Studi di Roma “La Sapienza”, 1991

Philip Golden Bartlett Professor of Economics giuseppe.moscarini@yale.edu 203-432-3596 http://campuspress.yale.edu/moscarini/ http://campuspress.yale.edu/moscarini/cv/ Moscarini Faculty Labor Economics Macroeconomics 451 College Street, room 211 10016184 FAS For students in ECON 116 and in ECON 525, Fall 2022, see course website and syllabus in Canvas. For Silliman College students: by appointment only (please e-mail), Mon 5-6pm. All others, please e-mail to schedule an appointment.
Ph.D.
Giuseppe Moscarini
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Location
TRUM87 B120
Term Code
202301
Meeting Times
TTh 10.00-11.20
ECON 521 01
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Contracts and the economics of organization. Topics may include dynamic contracts (both explicit and implicit), career concerns, hierarchies, Bayesian mechanism design, renegotiation, and corporate control.
Instructor(s)

Ryota Iijima

Assistant Professor of Economics ryota.iijima@yale.edu 203-432-9607 https://sites.google.com/site/ryotaiijimaecon/ Iijima Faculty Economic Theory 451 College Street, room 307 17131172 /sites/default/files/cv/Ryota_Iijima_CV.pdf FAS By Appointment Only
Research Staff
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999
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999
Location
HLH28 A102
Term Code
202301
Meeting Times
TTh 8.30-9.50
ECON 523 01
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A forum for advanced students to critically examine recent papers in the literature and present their own work.
Location
TRUM87 B120
Term Code
202301
Meeting Times
T 12.00-1.00
ECON 526 01
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Macroeconomic equilibrium in the presence of uninsurable labor income risk. Implications for savings, asset prices, unemployment.
Instructor(s)

Fabrizio Zilibotti

Fabrizio Zilibotti is Tuntex Professor of International and Development Economics in the Department of Economics at Yale University.

He earned a Laurea in Political Science at the Università di Bologna (1989) and a Ph.D. (1994) of Economics at the London School of Economics. He holds a Honorary Master of Arts degree (M.A., privatim) from Yale University. He is a former professor at Universitat Pompeu Fabra, University College London, Stockholm University, and the University of Zurich. He is a Fellow of the Econometric Society, EEA, CEPR and CESifo. He was the President of the European Economic Association in 2016.

He is the recipients of several grants and awards, among them, the Yrjö Jahnsson 2009 award (the European analogue of the John Bates Clark medal, assigned to the best economist in Europe under the age of 45); the Sun Yefang 2012 Award; the Ciliegia d’Oro (Golden Cherry) prize reserved to distinguished personalities in cultural, industrial, sport, and humanitarian fields from Emilia Romagna such as Enzo Ferrari and Luciano Pavarotti.

He has served in several editorial positions including co-editor of Econometrica (2016-19), chief editor of the Journal of the European Economic Association (2009-14), and director and managing editor of the Review of Economic Studies (2002-06).

His research interests include macroeconomics, economic growth and development, family economics, and the economic development of China. He has published articles in many international journals, among them, American Economic Review, Econometrica, Journal of Political Economy, Quarterly Journal of Economics, Review of Economic Studies.

He is an Italian citizen hailing from the town of Vignola (Modena). He is married to Maria Saez Marti and the father of one daughter, Nora.

Tuntex Professor of International and Development Economics fabrizio.zilibotti@yale.edu (203) 432-9561 https://campuspress.yale.edu/zilibotti/ https://www.dropbox.com/s/v7ezqpxrqg3pdjq/CURRICULUM_VITAE_31.12.20.pdf?dl=0 Zilibotti Faculty Development Economics Human Capital Macroeconomics Political Economy 451 College Street, room 206 17217634 FAS By Appointment Only
Fabrizio Zilibotti
Research Staff
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999
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999
Location
HLH28 A06
Term Code
202301
Meeting Times
Th 2.00-5.00
ECON 531 01
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This course examines the foundations of money and finance from the perspective of general equilibrium with incomplete markets. The relevant mathematical tools from elementary stochastic processes to differential topology are developed in the course. Topics include asset pricing, variations of the capital asset pricing model, the “Hahn paradox” on the value of flat money, default and bankruptcy, collateral equilibrium, market crashes, adverse selection and moral hazard with perfect competition, credit card equilibrium, and general equilibrium with asymmetric information.

Instructor(s)

Eduardo Davila

Eduardo Dávila is an Assistant Professor of Economics at Yale University and a Faculty Research Fellow at the NBER. Before joining Yale in 2018, he was an Assistant Professor of Finance at New York University's Stern School of Business. He was awarded the Top Finance Graduate award in 2014. His research interests lie at the intersection of financial economics and macroeconomics, with an emphasis on normative questions. Among other topics, he has recently studied the welfare implications of pecuniary externalities, the optimal determination of financial transaction taxes and corporate taxes, the optimal design of personal bankruptcy exemptions and deposit insurance schemes, the welfare costs of arbitrage violations, the optimal determination of optimal monetary policy in environments with rich individual heterogeneity, and different aspects of how financial markets aggregate information. He holds a B.A. in Economics from Universitat Pompeu Fabra in Barcelona, and a M.A. and a Ph.D. in Economics from Harvard University.

Assistant Professor of Economics eduardo.davila@yale.edu (203) 436-2506 http://www.eduardodavila.com http://www.eduardodavila.com/cv/davila_cv.pdf Davila Faculty Financial Economics International Finance Macroeconomics 451 College Street, room 210 17594881 FAS Other FAS and Academic Departments By Appointment Only
A headshot of Eduardo Davila
Research Staff
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999
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999
Location
HLH28 A07
Term Code
202301
Meeting Times
TTh 1.00-2.15
ECON 538 01
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Presentations by research scholars and participating students.
Location
TRUM87 B120
Term Code
202301
Meeting Times
W 2.30-3.50
ECON 541 01
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A course that gives third- and fourth-year students doing research in macroeconomics an opportunity to prepare their prospectuses and to present their dissertation work. Each student is required to make at least two presentations per term. For third-year students and beyond, at least one of the presentations in the first term should be a mock job talk.
Location
TRUM87 B120
Term Code
202301
Meeting Times
Th 12.00-1.00
ECON 543 01
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A forum for presentation and discussion of state-of-the-art research in macroeconomics. Presentations by research scholars and participating students of papers in closed economy and open economy macroeconomics and monetary economics.
Location
TRUM87 B120
Term Code
202301
Meeting Times
T 2.30-3.50
ECON 548 01
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This course analyzes empirically and theoretically the political, institutional, and social underpinnings of economic development. We cover an array of topics ranging from power structures to corruption, state capacity, social capital, conflict, democratization, and democratic backsliding. We focus on recent advances to identify open areas for further research.

Instructor(s)

Gerard Padro

Gerard Padro i Miquel is a Professor of Economics and Political Science at Yale University, where he is also the Director of the Leitner Program of International and Comparative Political Economy. He is interested in the interplay between politics and economics as a barrier for development with a focus on civil conflict and on the politics of non-democratic regimes. His previous work has been published at the Quarterly Journal of Economics, American Economic Review, Review of Economic Studies and the Quarterly Journal of Political Science among others.

Professor of Economics and Political Science gerard.padroimiquel@yale.edu +1 (203) 432-5011 https://www.gerardpadro.com/ Padro Faculty Development Economics Political Economy Rosenkranz Hall, room 335 17502112 /sites/default/files/cv/GERARD%20PADR%C3%93%20i%20MIQUEL%20CV.pdf FAS Other FAS and Academic Departments Wednesday, 1:30-2:30 pm
Padró i Miquel, Gerard headshot
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Location
HLH28 A07
Term Code
202301
Meeting Times
W 1.00-3.30
ECON 551 01
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Provides a basic knowledge of econometric theory, and an ability to carry out empirical work in economics. Topics include linear regression and extensions, including regression diagnostics, generalized least squares, statistical inference, dynamic models, instrumental variables and maximum likelihood procedures, simultaneous equations, nonlinear and qualitative-choice models. Examples from cross-section, time series, and panel data applications.
Location
TRUM87 B120
Term Code
202301
Meeting Times
MW 8.30-9.50
ECON 552 01
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The treatment of the subject is rigorous, attentive to modern developments, and proceeds to research level in several areas. Linear models from core curriculum. Topics include linear estimation theory, multiple and multivariate regressions, Kruskal’s theorem and its applications, classical statistical testing by likelihood ratio, Lagrange multiplier and Wald procedures, bootstrap methods, specification tests, Stein-like estimation, instrumental variables, and an introduction to inferential methods in simultaneous stochastic equations.

Location
HLH28 A106
Term Code
202301
Meeting Times
TTh 1.15-2.30
ECON 553 01
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A sequel to ECON 552, the course proceeds to research level in time series econometrics. Topics include an introduction to ergodic theory, Wold decomposition, spectral theory, martingales, martingale convergence theory, mixing processes, strong laws, and central limit theory for weak dependent sequences with applications to econometric models and model determination.
Location
HLH28 A07
Term Code
202301
Meeting Times
M 2.30-5.00
ECON 554 01
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The first half of this course is about nonlinear parametric models. Specification, estimation, and testing within the Likelihood and Generalized Method of Moments frameworks. First-order asymptotics for both smooth and non-smooth objective functions. Efficiency and robustness. A short account of high-order asymptotics for smooth problems. The second part is on nonparametric and semiparametric methods. Nonparametric estimation by kernels, series, splines, and other methods. Bias reduction and bandwidth selection. The course of dimensionality and additive models. Specification and estimation of semiparametric models. U-statistics and asymptotic properties. Efficiency and adaptation.
Instructor(s)

Xiaohong Chen

Xiaohong Chen is the Malcolm K. Brachman Professor of Economics, Yale University. Previously Chen has taught at University of Chicago, London School of Economics and New York University. Chen got her PhD in Economics from University of California, San Diego.

Chen is an elected member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences since 2019, a fellow of the Econometric Society since 2007, a founding fellow of the International Association for Applied Econometrics since 2018, a fellow of the Journal of Econometrics since 2012, and an international fellow of Cemmap since 2007. Chen is a winner of the 2017 China Economics Prize. Chen has been a keynote or an invited speaker in many international conferences. She was the 2018 Sargan Lecturer of the Econometric Society, the 2019 Hilda Geiringer Lecturer, and the 2017 Econometric Theory lecturer.

Chen’s research field is econometrics. She is known for her research in penalized sieve estimation and inference on semiparametric and nonparametric models, such as semiparametric models of nonlinear time series, empirical asset pricing, copula, missing data, measurement error, nonparametric instrumental variables, semi/nonparametric conditional moment restrictions, causal inference.

Chen has published peer-reviewed papers in top-ranked general-purpose journals in economics: Econometrica and Review of Economic Studies; as well as in top-ranked journals in statistics and engineering: Annals of Statistics, Journal of the American Statistical Association, IEEE Tran Information Theory, IEEE Trans Neural Networks.


Chen also published several invited review chapters, including a chapter on the method of sieves in 2007 Handbook of Econometrics volumne 6B. She also won Econometric Theory Multa Scripsit Award in 2012, The Journal of Nonparametric Statistics 2010 Best Paper Award, The Richard Stone Prize in Journal of Applied Econometrics for the years 2008 and 2009, The Arnold Zellner Award for the best theory paper published in Journal of Econometrics in 2006 and 2007. Her PhD thesis was about stochastic approximation/Robbins-Monro procedure in function space for near-epoch dependent processes.

Chen is an editor of Journal of Econometrics since Jan 2019.
Chen was an associate editor of Econometrica, Review of Economic Studies, Quantitative Economics, Journal of Econometrics, Econometric Theory, Journal of Nonparametric Statistics, Econometrics Journal, and others.

Malcolm K. Brachman Professor of Economics and Professor of Management xiaohong.chen@yale.edu 203-432-5852 https://sites.google.com/site/xiaohongchenyale/ Chen Faculty Econometrics 451 College Street, room 402B 12462467 /sites/default/files/cv/chencv-latest-Yale-2022Aug.pdf FAS Friday, 4:30 - 6:00 pm
Research Staff
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999
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999
Location
HLH28 A06
Term Code
202301
Meeting Times
F 3.00-5.30
ECON 561 01
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How to use computational methods to solve and analyze dynamic economic models. The first part of the course covers standard tools of numerical analysis that are useful in economics (minimization of functions, root-finding, interpolation, approximation of functions, integration, simulation). The second shows how to use these tools to study dynamic economic problems in macroeconomics, finance, labor economics, public finance, and industrial organization, paying special attention to methods for solving stochastic dynamic programming problems and for computing equilibria in economic models with heterogeneous actors.
Location
TRUM87 B120
Term Code
202301
Meeting Times
MW 4.00-5.15
ECON 568 01
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A forum for state-of-the-art research in econometrics. Its primary purpose is to disseminate the results and the technical machinery of ongoing research in theoretical and applied fields.
Location
HLH28 A106
Term Code
202301
Meeting Times
W 4.00-5.30
ECON 571 01
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A course for third- and fourth-year students doing research in econometrics to prepare their prospectus and present dissertation work.
Location
HLH28 A106
Term Code
202301
Meeting Times
M 12.00-1.00
ECON 581 01
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This course examines both the long-term factors (such as industrialization and the development of markets) and the epochal events (such as the Revolution, Civil War, and Great Depression) that have shaped the development of the American economy. The objectives of this course are to familiarize students with the major topics and debates in American economic history.
Location
HLH28 A06
Term Code
202301
Meeting Times
TTh 8.30-9.50
ECON 589 01
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A forum for discussion and criticism of research in progress. Presenters include graduate students, Yale faculty, and visitors. Topics concerned with long-run trends in economic organization are suitable for the seminar. Special emphasis given to the use of statistics and of economic theory in historical research.
Location
HLH28 A106
Term Code
202301
Meeting Times
M 4.00-5.30
ECON 601 01
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Examination of alternative modes of public control of economic sectors with primary emphasis on antitrust and public utility regulation in the U.S. economy. Public policy issues in sectors of major detailed governmental involvement.
Location
HLH28 A06
Term Code
202301
Meeting Times
TTh 10.30-11.50
ECON 607 01
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For third-year students in microeconomics, intended to guide students in the early stages of theoretical and empirical dissertation research. Emphasis on regular writing assignments and oral presentations.
Location
HLH28 106
Term Code
202301
Meeting Times
Th 12.00-1.00
ECON 609 01
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For advanced graduate students in applied microeconomics, serving as a forum for presentation and discussion of work in progress of students, Yale faculty members, and invited speakers.
Term Code
202301
Meeting Times
T 2.30-3.45
ECON 631 01
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Topics include static and dynamic models of labor supply, human capital wage function estimation, firm-specific training, compensating wage differentials, discrimination, household production, bargaining models of household behavior, intergenerational transfers, and mobility.
Instructor(s)

Yusuke Narita

Yusuke Narita is an Assistant Professor at Yale University. His research centers around the design of decision-making algorithms in policy and business, with a particular interest in education policy. His work uses a variety of methods such as causal inference, machine learning, economic theory, and structural econometric modeling. His work has been published in journals including Econometrica, AAAI (Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence), American Economic Review, Journal of Economic Theory, Management Science, NeurIPS (Neural Information Processing Systems), and PNAS. He obtained a Ph.D. from MIT and was formally a visiting assistant professor at Stanford University.

Assistant Professor of Economics yusuke.narita@yale.edu 203-432-3559 http://www.yusuke-narita.com Narita Faculty Econometrics Economic Theory Economics of Education Labor Economics 37 Hillhouse, Rm 38 17134317 /sites/default/files/cv/Yusuke_Narita_CV.pdf FAS Wednesday 12:00-2:00 pm and Thursday 5:30-6:00 pm
A Headshot of Narita
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999
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999
Location
HLH28 A102
Term Code
202301
Meeting Times
MW 10.30-11.50
ECON 639 01
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A forum primarily for graduate students to present their research plans and findings. Discussions encompass empirical microeconomic research relating to both high- and low-income countries.
Location
TRUM87 B120
Term Code
202301
Meeting Times
Th 3.30-5.00
ECON 672 01
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Much of modern financial economics works with models in which agents are rational, in that they maximize expected utility and use Bayes’s law to update their beliefs. Behavioral finance is a large and active field that studies models in which some agents are less than fully rational. Such models have two building blocks: limits to arbitrage, which make it difficult for rational traders to undo the dislocations caused by less rational traders; and psychology, which catalogues the kinds of deviations from full rationality we might expect to see. We discuss these two topics and then consider a number of applications: asset pricing (the aggregate stock market and the cross-section of average returns); individual trading behavior; and corporate finance (security issuance, corporate investment, and mergers).

Term Code
202301
Meeting Times
Th 4.10-7.10p
ECON 675 01
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The course exposes students to main stochastic modeling methods and solution concepts used to study problems in operations research and management. The first half of the class covers analysis of queuing models such as Markovian queues, networks of queues, and queues with general arrival or service distributions, as well as approximation techniques such as heavy traffic approximation. The second half focuses on control of stochastic processes; it covers finite and infinite-horizon dynamic programming problems, and special classes such as linear quadratic problems, optimal stopping, and multi-armed bandit problems.

Location
EVANS
Term Code
202301
Meeting Times
T 2.45-5.45
ECON 675 02
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The course exposes students to main stochastic modeling methods and solution concepts used to study problems in operations research and management. The first half of the class covers analysis of queuing models such as Markovian queues, networks of queues, and queues with general arrival or service distributions, as well as approximation techniques such as heavy traffic approximation. The second half focuses on control of stochastic processes; it covers finite and infinite-horizon dynamic programming problems, and special classes such as linear quadratic problems, optimal stopping, and multi-armed bandit problems.

Location
EVANS
Term Code
202301
Meeting Times
T 2.45-5.45
ECON 679 01
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This workshop is for third-year and other advanced students in financial economics. It is intended to guide students in the early stages of dissertation research. The emphasis is on presentation and discussion of materials presented by students that will eventually lead to dissertation topics. Open to third-year and advanced Ph.D. students only.

Term Code
202301
ECON 707 01
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This workshop is for third-year and other advanced students in international economic fields. It is intended to guide students in the early stages of dissertation research. The emphasis is on students’ presentation and discussion of material that will eventually lead to the prospectus.

Location
HLH28 A106
Term Code
202301
Meeting Times
T 12.00-1.00
ECON 721 01
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The course covers empirical topics in international trade with particular emphasis on current research areas. Topics include tests of international trade theories; studies of the relationship between international trade, labor markets, and income distribution; recent trade liberalization episodes in developing countries; empirical assessment of various trade policies, such as VERs and Anti-Dumping; productivity (and its relation to international trade liberalization); and exchange rates, market integration, and international trade. Methodologically, the course draws heavily on empirical models used in the fields of industrial organization and to a lesser degree labor economics; taking these courses is thus recommended though not required.
Instructor(s)

Samuel Kortum

  B.A., Wesleyan University, 1983 Ph.D., Economics, Yale University, May 1992 Samuel Kortum is Fellow of the Econometric Society, Member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and Research Associate at the NBER. Before coming to Yale in 2012, he served on the faculty at Boston University, the University of Minnesota, and the University of Chicago. In 2004, he and Jonathan Eaton received the Frisch Medal for their paper “Technology, Geography, and Trade” published in Econometrica. In 2018, they shared the Onassis Prize in International Trade. Kortum served as an editor of the Journal of Political Economy from 2008-2012. In addition to international economics, he has written on economic growth, innovation, technology diffusion, and firm dynamics.

James Burrows Moffatt Professor of Economics and Professor of Management samuel.kortum@yale.edu 203-432-6217 http://kortum.elisites.yale.edu/ https://1df379c8-a-c3bd8240-s-sites.googlegroups.com/a/yale.edu/kortum/VITAE20.pdf?attachauth=ANoY7cptm-dryv72RE_Ga6RUSuJVdP9uXZmM-l33dMyGBGzIewR2mDH3Ll1XIFIsuRBxSY3fhLPvEtRZB0UibZGzItwcf_KJm5j9hMo6GFDrzjYc03mu6wLfqk32Tb5zHRwPrIZt5I3y22RqngPSd54o37wr9reWE_dIWcWCPfs7sGg3Tadwah1-hHVlFRi5nxrvm1hSs0I7&attredirects=0 Kortum Faculty Industrial Organization International Trade Macroeconomics 37 Hillhouse Ave. 14460188 FAS Wednesday, 4:30 - 5:30 pm
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999
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999
Location
HLH28 A07
Term Code
202301
Meeting Times
TTh 2.30-3.45
ECON 731 01
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Analysis of development experiences since World War II. Planning and policy making across countries and time. Models of development, growth, foreign trade, and investment. Trade, capital, and technology flows and increasing interdependence. The political economy of policy making and policy reform.
Location
HLH28 A102
Term Code
202301
Meeting Times
MW 4.00-5.15
ECON 732 01
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Examines the models of classical and modern economists to explain the transition of developing economies into modern economic growth, as well as their relevance to income distribution, poverty alleviation, and human development.
Instructor(s)

Michael Boozer

  Ph.D., Economics, Princeton University, 1995 B.S., Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1988

Director International and Development Economics Program & Director of Graduate Studies, IDE Program michael.boozer@yale.edu 203-432-3623 Boozer Lecturer Econometrics Labor Economics 27 Hillhouse Ave 10331874 FAS
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999
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999
Location
1 HTBA
Term Code
202301
Meeting Times
1 HTBA
ECON 750 01
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A forum for graduate students and faculty with an interest in the economic problems of developing countries. Faculty, students, and a limited number of outside speakers discuss research in progress.
Location
TRUM87 B120
Term Code
202301
Meeting Times
M 2.30-3.50
ECON 756 01
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Workshop for students doing research in development to present and discuss work.
Location
TRUM87 B120
Term Code
202301
Meeting Times
M 12.00-1.00
ECON 794 01
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Theoretical and empirical research in international trade policy. The course focuses on welfare analysis of trade policies under perfect completion and under oligopoly; the political economy of trade policy; and the economics and political economy of international trade agreements.
Instructor(s)

Giovanni Maggi

Working Papers

Giovanni Maggi received a B.A. degree from Bocconi University, Milan, and a PhD in Economics from Stanford University. He has been at Yale since 2007. His current research focuses on international agreements on regulatory and environmental policies.

Howard H. Leach Professor of Economics, Professor of Management, Director of Undergraduate Studies giovanni.maggi@yale.edu Maggi FacultyLeadership International Trade Political Economy 115 Prospect St., Room 334 12583065 /sites/default/files/cv/Giovanni_Maggi_CV.pdf FAS Tue 1:15-2:45 (in person)
Research Staff
Sort Order Department
999
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999
Location
HLH28 A102
Term Code
202301
Meeting Times
TTh 1.15-2.30