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Undergraduate Courses Fall 2022

ECON 108 01
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Introductory microeconomics with a special emphasis on quantitative methods and examples. Intended for students with limited or no experience with calculus.

Instructor(s)

Tolga Koker

  Post-Doctoral Fellow at CMES, Harvard University, 2006 Ph.D., Economics (Political Economy), University of Southern California, 2004 M.A., (Political Economy), University of Southern California, 1995 M.A., International Political Economy, University of Pittsburgh, 1992 B.A., International Relations, METU (Turkey), 1989 (Honors)

Senior Lecturer in Economics tolga.koker@yale.edu (203) 432-3355 Koker Lecturer International Trade Macroeconomics WLH 12391832 /sites/default/files/cv_koker.pdf FAS Other FAS and Academic Departments *Schedule signing will be held at WLH 107
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999
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Term Code
202203
Meeting Times
1 HTBA WLH 114
TTh 11.35-12.50
ECON 110 01
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Similar to ECON 115, but taught as a lecture discussion with limited enrollment.

Instructor(s)

Tolga Koker

  Post-Doctoral Fellow at CMES, Harvard University, 2006 Ph.D., Economics (Political Economy), University of Southern California, 2004 M.A., (Political Economy), University of Southern California, 1995 M.A., International Political Economy, University of Pittsburgh, 1992 B.A., International Relations, METU (Turkey), 1989 (Honors)

Senior Lecturer in Economics tolga.koker@yale.edu (203) 432-3355 Koker Lecturer International Trade Macroeconomics WLH 12391832 /sites/default/files/cv_koker.pdf FAS Other FAS and Academic Departments *Schedule signing will be held at WLH 107
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999
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999
Location
WLH 114
Term Code
202203
Meeting Times
TTh 1.00-2.15
ECON 110 02
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Similar to ECON 115, but taught as a lecture discussion with limited enrollment.

Instructor(s)

Tolga Koker

  Post-Doctoral Fellow at CMES, Harvard University, 2006 Ph.D., Economics (Political Economy), University of Southern California, 2004 M.A., (Political Economy), University of Southern California, 1995 M.A., International Political Economy, University of Pittsburgh, 1992 B.A., International Relations, METU (Turkey), 1989 (Honors)

Senior Lecturer in Economics tolga.koker@yale.edu (203) 432-3355 Koker Lecturer International Trade Macroeconomics WLH 12391832 /sites/default/files/cv_koker.pdf FAS Other FAS and Academic Departments *Schedule signing will be held at WLH 107
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999
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999
Location
WLH 114
Term Code
202203
Meeting Times
TTh 2.30-3.45
ECON 110 03
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Similar to ECON 115, but taught as a lecture discussion with limited enrollment.

Instructor(s)

María Sáez Martí

María Sáez Martí  is a senior lecturer of Economics at Yale University. Before coming to Yale, she was a professor of microeconomics at the University of Zurich. She also held academic positions at Universitat Pompeu Fabra, University of London and Stockholm School of Economics. 

Her research focuses on microeconomics and game theory with a special interest on cultural transmission and endogenous preferences. She has published her research in the Journal of Economic Theory, Games and Economic Behavior, International Journal of Game Theory, Journal of Urban Economics, and Journal of Population Economics.

Sáez holds a Ph.D. in Economics from University College London, an M.Sc. from the London School of Economics, and a B.Sc. from the University of Valencia.

Senior Lecturer maria.saez@yale.edu (203) 432-6568 Saez Marti Lecturer Economic Theory 30 Hillhouse Ave., Rm 20 17217651 FAS Other FAS and Academic Departments Tuesdays 1:10-3:10
Sáez Martí, María headshot
Research Staff
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999
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999
Location
WLH 114
Term Code
202203
Meeting Times
MW 11.35-12.50
ECON 110 04
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Similar to ECON 115, but taught as a lecture discussion with limited enrollment.

Instructor(s)

María Sáez Martí

María Sáez Martí  is a senior lecturer of Economics at Yale University. Before coming to Yale, she was a professor of microeconomics at the University of Zurich. She also held academic positions at Universitat Pompeu Fabra, University of London and Stockholm School of Economics. 

Her research focuses on microeconomics and game theory with a special interest on cultural transmission and endogenous preferences. She has published her research in the Journal of Economic Theory, Games and Economic Behavior, International Journal of Game Theory, Journal of Urban Economics, and Journal of Population Economics.

Sáez holds a Ph.D. in Economics from University College London, an M.Sc. from the London School of Economics, and a B.Sc. from the University of Valencia.

Senior Lecturer maria.saez@yale.edu (203) 432-6568 Saez Marti Lecturer Economic Theory 30 Hillhouse Ave., Rm 20 17217651 FAS Other FAS and Academic Departments Tuesdays 1:10-3:10
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Research Staff
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999
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999
Location
WLH 114
Term Code
202203
Meeting Times
MW 1.00-2.15
ECON 111 01
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Similar to ECON 116, but taught as a lecture discussion with limited enrollment.

Instructor(s)

William Hawkins

William Hawkins is a Senior Lecturer in Economics at Yale University. He was previously a faculty member at the University of Rochester and at Yeshiva University.

His research interests are in macroeconomics, and specifically in search theory and its implications for macroeconomics. At Yale, Dr. Hawkins' main role is in teaching various forms of introductory macroeconomics for undergraduate students; he also teaches the Math Camp for incoming Ph.D. students.

Ph.D., Economics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 2006
B.A./B.Sc. (Hons), Australian National University, 2000

Senior Lecturer of Economics william.hawkins@yale.edu 203-432-5120 https://sites.google.com/view/williamhawkins/home https://sites.google.com/view/williamhawkins/cv Hawkins Lecturer Macroeconomics 28 Hillhouse 12726630 Wednesdays 10:00-11:00 and Fridays 1:30-2:30
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999
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Location
WLH 117
Term Code
202203
Meeting Times
MW 11.35-12.50
ECON 115 01
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An introduction to the basic tools of microeconomics to provide a rigorous framework for understanding how individuals, firms, markets, and governments allocate scarce resources. The design and evaluation of public policy.

Instructor(s)

Cormac O'Dea

Cormac O'Dea is an Assistant Professor of Economics at Yale University. He is also a Research Fellow at the Institute for Fiscal Studies and a Faculty Research Fellow at the National Bureau of Economic Research. His research interests are in household saving, retirement and intergenerational links in economic outcomes.

Assistant Professor of Economics cormac.odea@yale.edu 2-7572 https://sites.google.com/site/cormacodea/home https://www.dropbox.com/s/ru9fq9y1vcqq4q9/cvODeaAugust22.pdf?dl=0 O'Dea Faculty Labor Economics Public Economics 37 Hillhouse Ave., Room 2 17350540 FAS Wednesday 2.45pm - 3.45pm
O'Dea, Cormac headshot
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Location
YSB MARSH
Term Code
202203
Meeting Times
MW 1.00-2.15
ECON 116 01
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An introduction that stresses how the macroeconomy works, including the determination of output, unemployment, inflation, interest rates, and exchange rates. Economic theory is applied to current events.

Instructor(s)

Fabrizio Zilibotti

Fabrizio Zilibotti is Tuntex Professor of International and Development Economics in the Department of Economics at Yale University.

He earned a Laurea in Political Science at the Università di Bologna (1989) and a Ph.D. (1994) of Economics at the London School of Economics. He holds a Honorary Master of Arts degree (M.A., privatim) from Yale University. He is a former professor at Universitat Pompeu Fabra, University College London, Stockholm University, and the University of Zurich. He is a Fellow of the Econometric Society, EEA, CEPR and CESifo. He was the President of the European Economic Association in 2016.

He is the recipients of several grants and awards, among them, the Yrjö Jahnsson 2009 award (the European analogue of the John Bates Clark medal, assigned to the best economist in Europe under the age of 45); the Sun Yefang 2012 Award; the Ciliegia d’Oro (Golden Cherry) prize reserved to distinguished personalities in cultural, industrial, sport, and humanitarian fields from Emilia Romagna such as Enzo Ferrari and Luciano Pavarotti.

He has served in several editorial positions including co-editor of Econometrica (2016-19), chief editor of the Journal of the European Economic Association (2009-14), and director and managing editor of the Review of Economic Studies (2002-06).

His research interests include macroeconomics, economic growth and development, family economics, and the economic development of China. He has published articles in many international journals, among them, American Economic Review, Econometrica, Journal of Political Economy, Quarterly Journal of Economics, Review of Economic Studies.

He is an Italian citizen hailing from the town of Vignola (Modena). He is married to Maria Saez Marti and the father of one daughter, Nora.

Tuntex Professor of International and Development Economics fabrizio.zilibotti@yale.edu (203) 432-9561 https://campuspress.yale.edu/zilibotti/ https://www.dropbox.com/s/v7ezqpxrqg3pdjq/CURRICULUM_VITAE_31.12.20.pdf?dl=0 Zilibotti Faculty Development Economics Human Capital Macroeconomics Political Economy 451 College Street, room 206 17217634 FAS By Appointment Only
Fabrizio Zilibotti
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Giuseppe Moscarini

Giuseppe Moscarini is the Philip Golden Bartlett Professor of Economics at Yale University and a Research Associate of the National Bureau of Economic Research, Economics Fluctuations and Growth program, where he co-chairs the working group on the Micro and Macroeconomic Perspectives on the Aggregate Labor Market. He is also Co-Director of the Research Program in Macroeconomics at the Cowles Foundation for Research in Economics. He was previously the Henry Kohn Associate Professor of Economics at Yale University, and a Research Fellow of the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation. He served on the editorial board of several professional journals, as co-Editor of Theoretical Economics and Associate Editor of the Journal of Economic Theory. He has been a regular Visiting Scholar of the research departments at the Federal Reserve Banks of Philadelphia and New York.

Moscarini is a macroeconomist who specializes in the theoretical and empirical analysis of labor markets, specifically of unemployment, wage inequality, worker turnover, and the business cycle performance of large and small firms. He has also written extensively on pricing and monetary policy, as well as on the economics of information. His recent research focuses on measurement of labor market flows in the US, specifically recalls of laid off workers and employer-to-employer transitions; he estimated time series of both types of turnover, that he continuously updates and makes available to researchers on his website. His ongoing research investigates the link between labor market mismatch and wage inflation; he proposes and estimates a new Phillips curve, where labor market flows help predict wage and price pressure above and beyond the canonical rate of unemployment.

Ph.D., Economics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1996
Laurea in Economia e Commercio, Università degli Studi di Roma “La Sapienza”, 1991

Philip Golden Bartlett Professor of Economics giuseppe.moscarini@yale.edu 203-432-3596 http://campuspress.yale.edu/moscarini/ http://campuspress.yale.edu/moscarini/cv/ Moscarini Faculty Labor Economics Macroeconomics 451 College Street, room 211 10016184 FAS For students in ECON 116 and in ECON 525, Fall 2022, see course website and syllabus in Canvas. For Silliman College students: by appointment only (please e-mail), Mon 5-6pm. All others, please e-mail to schedule an appointment.
Ph.D.
Giuseppe Moscarini
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999
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Location
DL 220
Term Code
202203
Meeting Times
MW 1.00-2.15
ECON 117 01
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Introduction to data analysis from the beginning of the econometrics sequence; exposure to modern empirical economics; and development of credible economic analysis. This course emphasizes working directly and early with data, through such economic examples as studies of environmental/natural resource economics, intergenerational mobility, discrimination, and finance. Topics include: probability, statistics, and sampling; selection, causation and causal inference; regression and model specification; and machine learning and big data.

Instructor(s)

John Eric Humphries

John Eric Humphries is a labor economist who focuses on topics in education, housing, and policy evaluation. His work in education studies how educational and career dynamics are affected by public policy. Much of this work focuses on how policy affects the acquisition of human capital and the role of cognitive and non-cognitive skills in the labor market. His work on housing focuses on the the impacts of eviction on tenants and the rental market. You can read more about his research at johnerichumphries.com

John Eric earned his Ph.D. from the University of Chicago in 2017. He is a member of the National Bureau of Economics Research, the Human Capital and Economic Opportunity MIP working group, and the CESifo Research Network. He is an associate editor for the Journal of Political Economy: Microeconomics, and the Journal of Human Capital.

Assistant Professor of Economics john.humphries@yale.edu 203-432-5075 http://johnerichumphries.com/ https://johnerichumphries.com/Humphries_CV.pdf Humphries Faculty Economics of Education Labor Economics 37 Hillhouse Ave., Room 8 17357697 FAS
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999
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999
Location
LC 102
Term Code
202203
Meeting Times
TTh 11.35-12.50
ECON 121 01
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The theory of resource allocation and its applications. Topics include the theory of choice, consumer and firm behavior, production, price determination in different market structures, welfare, and market failure.

Instructor(s)

Evangelia Chalioti

Evangelia Chalioti is a Senior Lecturer and Associate Chair at the Department of Economics of Yale University. She received her PhD degree in Economics from the Athens University of Economics and Business. Her research revolves around competition, markets and innovation. She studies the Economics of Artificial Intelligence and how cutting-edge technologies transform business. Her research focuses on analyzing the effects of risk and the diffusion of scientific knowledge on firms’ incentives to innovate and compete. She also examines the conditions under which workers help or sabotage their colleagues in their attempt to build up their own reputation.

Senior Lecturer evangelia.chalioti@yale.edu 203-432-3727 https://sites.google.com/view/evachalioti/homecv https://drive.google.com/file/d/1vIbW58JubsGucuZKLd4TFRp6bjLvuVQ1/view?usp=sharing Chalioti Lecturer Economic Theory Industrial Organization 451 College Str., Room 305 15393505 /sites/default/files/cv/Eva_Chalioti_Yale_Economics_CV_August_2022.pdf FAS By Appointment Only
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999
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999
Location
DAVIES AUD
Term Code
202203
Meeting Times
TTh 1.00-2.15
ECON 122 01
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Contemporary theories of employment, finance, money, business fluctuations, and economic growth. Their implications for monetary and fiscal policy. Emphasis on empirical studies, financial and monetary crises, and recent policies and problems.

Instructor(s)

Michael Peters

Michael Peters is an Associate Professor of Economics at Yale University, a Faculty Research Fellow of the National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER) and a Research Affiliate at the Centre for Economic Policy Research (CEPR). He received his PhD from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and held an Assistant Professor position at the London School of Economics before joining Yale.

In his research he focuses on economic growth and long-run economic development. He has worked on theories of firm-dynamics, highlighting the role of markups for misallocation, the importance of managerial delegation for firm growth, and the consequences of falling population growth. In his work on growth and economic geography, he analyzed the long-run consequences of large-scale migration, both in post-war Germany and for the US in the 19th century. Finally, he studied the process of structural change, both in the US in the past and for present-day India, emphasizing the consequences on inequality across both people and space.

Associate Professor of Economics m.peters@yale.edu 203-436-8475 http://mipeters.weebly.com Peters Faculty Development Economics International Trade Macroeconomics Spatial Economics 451 College Street, room 214A 14476406 /sites/default/files/cv/cv_michael_peters.pdf FAS By appointment, please e-mail.
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999
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999
Location
LC 102
Term Code
202203
Meeting Times
MW 11.35-12.50
ECON 123 01
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Comprehensive and theoretical examination of econometrics, with further exploration of topics covered in ECON 117. A term research project addresses a research question chosen by the student, and involves the application of learned methods to a relevant data set.

Instructor(s)

Costas Meghir

Costas Meghir is the “Douglas A. Warner III” Professor of Economics at Yale University. He obtained his Ph.D. from Manchester University. He is a Member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, Fellow of the Econometric Society, Fellow of the British Academy, and Fellow of the Society for Labor Economics. He was awarded the Ragnar Frisch medal by the Econometric Society in 2000 and the Bodosakis foundation prize in 1997. He has been co-editor of Econometrica and joint managing editor of the Economic Journal. His current research is focused on informal labor markets, labor supply and welfare programs, the economics of the family, including marriage markets and intrahousehold allocation of resources, and on human capital and early childhood development (ECD). He is involved in designing and testing ECD interventions by RCT in both developing countries and the US, aimed at improving child outcomes and mitigating the intergenerational transmission of poverty.

Douglas A. Warner III Professor of Economics and Professor of Management c.meghir@yale.edu 203-432-3558 https://sites.google.com/yale.edu/costasmeghir/home https://www.dropbox.com/s/vbqzerlpy9usi4k/cmcv-new.pdf?dl=0 Meghir Faculty Development Economics Economics of Education Human Capital Labor Economics Public Economics 37 Hillhouse Ave., Room 5 13547730 FAS Office hours by appointment, Thursdays 2:30 - 3:20pm
Research Staff Faculty Advisors
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999
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999
Location
HLH17 115
Term Code
202203
Meeting Times
TTh 1.00-2.15
ECON 125 01
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Similar to ECON 121 but with a more intensive treatment of consumer and producer theory, and covering additional topics including choice under uncertainty, game theory, contracting under hidden actions or hidden information, externalities and public goods, and general equilibrium theory. Recommended for students considering graduate study in economics.

Instructor(s)

Ryota Iijima

Assistant Professor of Economics ryota.iijima@yale.edu 203-432-9607 https://sites.google.com/site/ryotaiijimaecon/ Iijima Faculty Economic Theory 451 College Street, room 307 17131172 /sites/default/files/cv/Ryota_Iijima_CV.pdf FAS By Appointment Only
Research Staff
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999
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999
Location
HLH17 113
Term Code
202203
Meeting Times
MW 1.00-2.15
ECON 135 01
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Foundations of mathematical statistics: probability theory, distribution theory, parameter estimation, hypothesis testing, regression, and computer programming. Recommended for students considering graduate study in economics.

Instructor(s)

Yusuke Narita

Yusuke Narita is an Assistant Professor at Yale University. His research centers around the design of decision-making algorithms in policy and business, with a particular interest in education policy. His work uses a variety of methods such as causal inference, machine learning, economic theory, and structural econometric modeling. His work has been published in journals including Econometrica, AAAI (Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence), American Economic Review, Journal of Economic Theory, Management Science, NeurIPS (Neural Information Processing Systems), and PNAS. He obtained a Ph.D. from MIT and was formally a visiting assistant professor at Stanford University.

Assistant Professor of Economics yusuke.narita@yale.edu 203-432-3559 http://www.yusuke-narita.com Narita Faculty Econometrics Economic Theory Economics of Education Labor Economics 37 Hillhouse, Rm 38 17134317 /sites/default/files/cv/Yusuke_Narita_CV.pdf FAS Wednesday 12:00-2:00 pm and Thursday 5:30-6:00 pm
A Headshot of Narita
Research Staff
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999
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999
Location
WLH 207
Term Code
202203
Meeting Times
TTh 2.30-3.45
ECON 159 01
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An introduction to game theory and strategic thinking. Ideas such as dominance, backward induction, Nash equilibrium, evolutionary stability, commitment, credibility, asymmetric information, adverse selection, and signaling are applied to games played in class and to examples drawn from economics, politics, the movies, and elsewhere.

Instructor(s)

Benjamin Polak

  Ph.D., Economics, Harvard University, 1992 M.A., History, Northwestern University, 1986 B.A., Economics, Cambridge University (Trinity College), 1984 (First class honors)

William C. Brainard Professor of Economics benjamin.polak@yale.edu (203) 432-3560 Polak Faculty Economic Theory 37 Hillhouse Avenue 10402152 /sites/default/files/cv_polak.pdf FAS Other FAS and Academic Departments Friday 8:30-9:30 on Zoom: https://calendly.com/benjamin-polak/15min
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999
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Joyee Deb

Professor Deb is a microeconomic theorist, and a Professor of Economics at the Yale School of Management. Her research interests include repeated games, reputation, dynamic games, bargaining, organizational economics and industrial organization.

Professor of Economics joyee.deb@yale.edu http://som.yale.edu/joyee-deb https://www.dropbox.com/s/8f2jt3dvlqi3jn5/2_cv%202022.pdf?dl=0 Deb Affiliated Faculty Economic Theory Industrial Organization 165 Whitney 15300651 School Of Management
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999
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999
Location
DAVIES AUD
Term Code
202203
Meeting Times
TTh 11.35-12.50
ECON 170 01
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Application of economic principles to the study of the U.S. health care system. Emphasis on basic principles about the structure of the U.S. system, current problems, proposed solutions, and the context of health policy making and politics.

Instructor(s)

Howard Forman

Professor of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, in the Institute for Social and Policy Studies, of Economics, of Management and of Public Health (Health Policy) howard.forman@yale.edu +1 (203) 785-2384 https://som.yale.edu/faculty/howard-p-forman Forman Affiliated Faculty 789 Howard Ave 10237592 MED School of Medicine
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999
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999
Location
LUCE 101
Term Code
202203
Meeting Times
TTh 2.30-3.45
ECON 185 01
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A global view of the world economy and the salient issues in the short and the long run. Economics of crises, fiscal policy, debt, inequality, global imbalances, climate change. The course is based on reading, debating, and applying cutting edge macroeconomic research.

Instructor(s)

Aleh Tsyvinski

Papers

Ph.D., Economics, Universita of Minnesota, 2003 M.A., Economics, University of Minnesota, 2003 B.A., Economics and Banking, Belarus State Economic University, 1998 (Highest honors) Papers My Students

Arthur M. Okun Professor of Economics and of Management a.tsyvinski@yale.edu 203-432-9163 Tsyvinski Faculty Financial Economics International Finance Macroeconomics Public Economics 451 College Street, room 213A 12719983 /sites/default/files/cv/a_tsyvinski_cv_0.pdf FAS Tues & Thurs 1:20pm to 2:20pm
Aleh Tsyvinski
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999
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999
Location
WTS B51
Term Code
202203
Meeting Times
Th 1.30-3.20
ECON 186 01
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European economic growth and development from the late seventeenth century through the first stages of the British industrial revolution. The role of institutional development, trade and imperialism, agricultural improvements, and industrialization. Particular attention to comparisons between Britain and other parts of Europe.

Term Code
202203
ECON 209 01
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This course is intended to provide an introduction to the economic analysis of law. We examine the economic rationale(s) underlying various legal doctrines of both common law and statutory law, as well as the economic consequences of different legal doctrines. Previous coursework in economics, while helpful, is not a prerequisite for the course.

Location
HLH31 108
Term Code
202203
Meeting Times
W 3.30-5.20
ECON 212 01
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The course is an introduction to important economic ideas:  preferences and rationality, Pareto efficiency, economic equilibrium in a capitalist economy, externalities, the role of the state,  uncertainty and von Neumann-Morgenstern utility, the principle of insurance, elementary game theory (Nash equilibrium), the median voter theorem, political equilibrium with party competition, distributive justice, equality of opportunity,  and Arrow’s impossibility theorem. These topics are essential tools for political economists. 

Instructor(s)

John Roemer

John Roemer is the Elizabeth S. and A. Varick Professor of Political Science and Economics. He is a Fellow of the Econometric Society, and has been a Fellow of the Guggenheim Foundation and the Russell Sage Foundation. His research concerns political economy, and distributive justice. He is currently teaching Political Competition and a Workshop in Political Economy. Publications include: Political Competition, Harvard University Press, 2001; Equality of Opportunity, Harvard University Press, 1998, Theories of Distributive Justice, Harvard University Press, 1996.

Elizabeth S. and A. Varick Stout Professor of Political Science and Professor of Economics john.roemer@yale.edu 203-432-5249 http://politicalscience.yale.edu/people/john-roemer Roemer Affiliated Faculty Political Economy 124 Prospect St. 11113313 FAS
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999
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999
Term Code
202203
Meeting Times
Th 9.25-11.15
1 HTBA RKZ 202
ECON 250 01
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This course develops the theoretical knowledge and applied skills needed to understand empirical economic research and to plan and execute empirical projects. Topics include randomized trials, regression, instrumental variables, differences-in-differences, regression-discontinuity designs, and simultaneous equations models.

Term Code
202203
ECON 251 01
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Introduction to the economic analysis of investment decisions and financial markets. Topics include time discounting, portfolio choice, equilibrium pricing, arbitrage, market efficiency, equity valuation, fixed-income securities, derivative pricing, and financial intermediation.

Instructor(s)

Eduardo Davila

Eduardo Dávila is an Assistant Professor of Economics at Yale University and a Faculty Research Fellow at the NBER. Before joining Yale in 2018, he was an Assistant Professor of Finance at New York University's Stern School of Business. He was awarded the Top Finance Graduate award in 2014. His research interests lie at the intersection of financial economics and macroeconomics, with an emphasis on normative questions. Among other topics, he has recently studied the welfare implications of pecuniary externalities, the optimal determination of financial transaction taxes and corporate taxes, the optimal design of personal bankruptcy exemptions and deposit insurance schemes, the welfare costs of arbitrage violations, the optimal determination of optimal monetary policy in environments with rich individual heterogeneity, and different aspects of how financial markets aggregate information. He holds a B.A. in Economics from Universitat Pompeu Fabra in Barcelona, and a M.A. and a Ph.D. in Economics from Harvard University.

Assistant Professor of Economics eduardo.davila@yale.edu (203) 436-2506 http://www.eduardodavila.com http://www.eduardodavila.com/cv/davila_cv.pdf Davila Faculty Financial Economics International Finance Macroeconomics 451 College Street, room 210 17594881 FAS Other FAS and Academic Departments By Appointment Only
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999
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999
Location
WLH 201
Term Code
202203
Meeting Times
TTh 1.00-2.15
ECON 265 01
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The objective of this course is to give an overview of how economic analysis has developed, and an introduction to the varied ways in which some of the great economists of the past have gone about studying how the economy functions. We discuss the relevance of their theories to public policy and the role of the state, and consider the roles of pre-analytic vision, improvements in analytical technique, and external events (such as the Great Depression or Global Financial Crisis) in the development of economic analysis.

Instructor(s)

Robert Dimand

08/29/22 to 12/31/22

Professor of Economics
Brock University

Professor of Economics, Brock University robert.dimand@yale.edu Dimand Visiting Faculty 451 College Street, Room 204 10724710 /sites/default/files/cv/cv_dimand_2022.pdf FAS Other FAS and Academic Departments
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Visiting Faculty
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999
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Location
WLH 117
Term Code
202203
Meeting Times
MW 2.30-3.45
ECON 330 01
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Microeconomic theory brought to bear on current issues in natural resource policy. Topics include regulation of pollution, hazardous waste management, depletion of the world's forests and fisheries, wilderness and wildlife preservation, and energy planning.

Instructor(s)

Robert Mendelsohn

Edwin Weyerhaeuser Davis Professor of Forestry And Environmental Studies and Professor of Economics and of Management robert.mendelsohn@yale.edu +1 (203) 432-5128 http://environment.yale.edu/profile/mendelsohn/ Mendelsohn Affiliated Faculty 205 Prospect St. 10345168 FES School of Forestry and Environmental Studies
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999
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Location
WLH 201
Term Code
202203
Meeting Times
MW 10.30-11.20
ECON 331 01
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The essentials of energy and environmental economics, with applications. Analysis of core topics in public goods, intertemporal choice, uncertainty, decision theory, and exhaustible resources. Applications include energy security, nuclear power, the relationship between nuclear power and nuclear proliferation, and climate change.

Instructor(s)

William Nordhaus

Ph.D., Economics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1967 Certificat, Institut d’Etudes Politiques (Paris), 1962 B.A., 1963; M.A. (Priv.), Yale University, 1973

He was born in Albuquerque, New Mexico (which is part of the United States). He completed his undergraduate work at Yale University in 1963 and received his Ph.D. in Economics in 1967 from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, USA. He has been on the faculty of Yale University since 1967 and has been Full Professor of Economics since 1973 and also is Professor in Yale’s School of Forestry and Environmental Studies. Professor Nordhaus lives in downtown New Haven with his wife Barbara, who works at the Yale Child Study Center. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He is on the research staff of the National Bureau of Economic Research and has been a member and senior advisor of the Brookings Panel on Economic Activity, Washington, D.C. since 1972. Professor Nordhaus is current or past editor of several scientific journals and has served on the Executive Committees of the American Economic Association and the Eastern Economic Association. He serves on the Congressional Budget Office Panel of Economic Experts and was the first Chairman of the Advisory Committee for the Bureau of Economic Analysis. He was the first Chairman of the newly formed American Economic Association Committee on Federal Statistics. In 2004, he was awarded the prize of “Distinguished Fellow” by the American Economic Association. From 1977 to 1979, he was a Member of the President’s Council of Economic Advisers. From 1986 to 1988, he served as the Provost of Yale University. He has served on several committees of the National Academy of Sciences including the Committee on Nuclear and Alternative Energy Systems, the Panel on Policy Implications of Greenhouse Warming, the Committee on National Statistics, the Committee on Data and Research on Illegal Drugs, and the Committee on the Implications for Science and Society of Abrupt Climate Change. He recently chaired a Panel of the National Academy of Sciences which produced a report, Nature’s Numbers, that recommended approaches to integrate environmental and other non-market activity into the national economic accounts. More recently, he has directed the Yale Project on Non-Market Accounting, supported by the Glaser Foundation. He is the author of many books, among them Invention, Growth and Welfare, Is Growth Obsolete?, The Efficient Use of Energy Resources, Reforming Federal Regulation, Managing the Global Commons, Warming the World, and (joint with Paul Samuelson) the classic textbook, Economics, whose nineteenth edition was published in 2009. His research has focused on economic growth and natural resources, the economics of climate change, as well as the resource constraints on economic growth. Since the 1970s, he has developed economic approaches to global warming, including the construction of integrated economic and scientific models (the DICE and RICE models) to determine the efficient path for coping with climate change, with the latest vintage, DICE-2007, published in A Question of Balance (Yale University Press, 2008). Professor Nordhaus has also studied wage and price behavior, health economics, augmented national accounting, the political business cycle, productivity, and the “new economy.” His 1996 study of the economic history of lighting back to Babylonian times found that the measurement of long-term economic growth has been significantly underestimated. He returned to Mesopotamian economics with a study, published in 2002 before the war, of the costs of the U.S. war in Iraq, projecting a cost as high as $2 trillion. Recently, he has undertaken the “G-Econ project,” which provides the first comprehensive measures of economic activity at a geophysical scale.

Sterling Professor of Economics and Professor of Forestry and Environmental Studies william.nordhaus@yale.edu +1 (203) 432-3598 https://williamnordhaus.com/ https://drive.google.com/file/d/1JkpyPHUgb8v-LBSPGa-rbS2gBaY3WolY/view Nordhaus Faculty Environmental Economics Macroeconomics Public Economics 451 College Street, room 203 10454342 FAS Other FAS and Academic Departments By Appointment, On Leave Spring 2023
Research Staff Faculty Advisors
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999
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999
Location
WLH 208
Term Code
202203
Meeting Times
MW 11.35-12.50
ECON 350 01
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An introduction to general equilibrium theory and its application to finance and the theory of money. Recommended for students considering graduate study in economics, or a career in quantitative finance.

Instructor(s)

John Geanakoplos

John Geanakoplos is the James Tobin Professor of Economics and Chair of Hellenic Studies at Yale University. He has been Chair of the Yale Faculty of Arts and Sciences Senate, and was Director of the Cowles Foundation for Research in Economics for 9 years. He was twice Director of the Economics Program at the Santa Fe Institute and later Chair of the Science Steering Committee for the Santa Fe Institute. He was Managing Director of Fixed Income Research at the investment bank Kidder Peabody and one of the founders of the hedge fund Ellington Capital Management, where he remains a partner. He is a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the Econometric Society, and a recipient of the Samuelson Prize. He has testified several times in Congress about mortgage debt forgiveness. He got his BA at Yale summa cum laude in Mathematics in 1975, and his MA in Mathematics and his PhD in Economics at Harvard under Ken Arrow and Jerry Green in 1980. He won the 1970 United States Junior (under 21) Open Chess Championship.

Geanakoplos was an inventor of collateral general equilibrium and the leverage cycle (1997, 2003, 2008, 2010), which then became one of the leading explanations of the subsequent 2008 global financial crisis. He has collaborated for many years on this subject with Ana Fostel, and also Bill Zame and David Rappoport. His proof (1986) with Herakles Polemarchakis that financial equilibrium with incomplete markets is generically constrained inefficient is a fundamental explanation for why government interventions in the macroeconomy can be good policy. His “original sin” explanation (1998, 2000) with Olivia Mitchell and Steve Zeldes for the now impending bankruptcy of social security, which won him the Samuelson Prize, may he hopes yet become the basis for real social security reform. His concepts of strategic substitutes and strategic complements (1985) with Jeremy Bulow and Paul Klemperer have become standard terminology in game theoretic analyses of oligopoly. His notion of psychological games (1989) with David Pearce and Ennio Stacchetti has created a small but growing subfield of game theory, with journal issues devoted entirely to developments appearing on its 20th anniversary and its 30th. He has written many papers on monetary equilibrium and default with Pradeep Dubey, with whom he is also working on games of status.

James Tobin Professor of Economics john.geanakoplos@yale.edu 203-432-3397 http://campuspress.yale.edu/johngeanakoplos/ Geanakoplos Faculty Economic Theory Financial Economics International Finance Macroeconomics 451 College Street, room 303 10398225 /sites/default/files/cv/CV_John_Geanakoplos-2022_06_11.pdf FAS Via zoom on Monday's 2:30pm-4:00pm
John Geanakoplos
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Location
WLH 207
Term Code
202203
Meeting Times
MW 11.35-12.50
ECON 360 01
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Topics related to capital markets, with emphasis on the financial crisis of 2007–2008. The design, pricing, and trading of corporate bonds, credit derivatives, and money market instruments; bond restructuring, bond ratings, and financial crises; basic tools used to address such issues, including fixed income mathematics, binomial option pricing, and swaps.

Instructor(s)

Gary Gorton

Frederick Frank Class of 1954 Professor of Management and Finance gary.gorton@yale.edu 203-436-2857 Gorton Affiliated Faculty 165 Whitney 12730319 School Of Management
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999
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999
Location
EVANS 2200
Term Code
202203
Meeting Times
TTh 8.30-9.50
ECON 363 01
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Comprehensive survey of the causes, events, policy responses, and aftermath of the recent global financial crisis. Study of the dynamics of financial crises in a modern economy. Prerequisite: Successful completion of a course in introductory economics.

Instructor(s)

Andrew Metrick

Michael H. Jordan Professor of Finance and Management andrew.metrick@yale.edu +1 (203) 432-3069 http://faculty.som.yale.edu/andrewmetrick/ Metrick Affiliated Faculty 165 Whitney Ave. 12569771 School Of Management
Faculty Advisors
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999
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999
Location
EVANS 2400
Term Code
202203
Meeting Times
TTh 1.00-2.20
ECON 407 01
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A study of how consumers and firms are affected by the globalization of the world economy. Topics include trade costs, the current account, exchange rate pass-through, international macroeconomic co-movement, multinational production, and gains from globalization. 

Instructor(s)

Ana Fieler

Visiting Assistant Professor ana.fieler@yale.edu Fieler Lecturer 27 Hillhouse 17614584 FAS Other FAS and Academic Departments
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999
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999
Location
WTS A74
Term Code
202203
Meeting Times
MW 9.00-10.15
ECON 411 01
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Individual and collective choice in the presence of uncertainty and asymmetric information. Implications of such decision making for economic phenomena. Basic analytical tools for studying decisions under uncertainty. Asset markets, adverse selection, screening, signaling, moral hazard, incomplete contracts, bilateral trade with asymmetric information, and mechanism design.

Instructor(s)
Location
WTS A30
Term Code
202203
Meeting Times
TTh 1.00-2.15
ECON 412 01
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Introduction to international and environmental economics and to research that combines the two fields. Methods for designing and analyzing environmental policy when economic activity and pollution cross political borders. Effects of market openness on the environment and on environmental regulation; international economics and climate change.

Instructor(s)

Samuel Kortum

  B.A., Wesleyan University, 1983 Ph.D., Economics, Yale University, May 1992 Samuel Kortum is Fellow of the Econometric Society, Member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and Research Associate at the NBER. Before coming to Yale in 2012, he served on the faculty at Boston University, the University of Minnesota, and the University of Chicago. In 2004, he and Jonathan Eaton received the Frisch Medal for their paper “Technology, Geography, and Trade” published in Econometrica. In 2018, they shared the Onassis Prize in International Trade. Kortum served as an editor of the Journal of Political Economy from 2008-2012. In addition to international economics, he has written on economic growth, innovation, technology diffusion, and firm dynamics.

James Burrows Moffatt Professor of Economics and Professor of Management samuel.kortum@yale.edu 203-432-6217 http://kortum.elisites.yale.edu/ https://1df379c8-a-c3bd8240-s-sites.googlegroups.com/a/yale.edu/kortum/VITAE20.pdf?attachauth=ANoY7cptm-dryv72RE_Ga6RUSuJVdP9uXZmM-l33dMyGBGzIewR2mDH3Ll1XIFIsuRBxSY3fhLPvEtRZB0UibZGzItwcf_KJm5j9hMo6GFDrzjYc03mu6wLfqk32Tb5zHRwPrIZt5I3y22RqngPSd54o37wr9reWE_dIWcWCPfs7sGg3Tadwah1-hHVlFRi5nxrvm1hSs0I7&attredirects=0 Kortum Faculty Industrial Organization International Trade Macroeconomics 37 Hillhouse Ave. 14460188 FAS Wednesday, 4:30 - 5:30 pm
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999
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999
Location
WTS A46
Term Code
202203
Meeting Times
MW 1.00-2.15
ECON 414 01
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Analysis of firms’ incentives to innovate, focusing on the effects of market power on the intensity of innovative activity. Topics include strategic investment in innovation, patent races, the diffusion of knowledge, intellectual property (IP) protection systems, IP licensing, research joint ventures, litigation, venture capital, and conflicts between IP rights and antitrust regulation.

Instructor(s)

Evangelia Chalioti

Evangelia Chalioti is a Senior Lecturer and Associate Chair at the Department of Economics of Yale University. She received her PhD degree in Economics from the Athens University of Economics and Business. Her research revolves around competition, markets and innovation. She studies the Economics of Artificial Intelligence and how cutting-edge technologies transform business. Her research focuses on analyzing the effects of risk and the diffusion of scientific knowledge on firms’ incentives to innovate and compete. She also examines the conditions under which workers help or sabotage their colleagues in their attempt to build up their own reputation.

Senior Lecturer evangelia.chalioti@yale.edu 203-432-3727 https://sites.google.com/view/evachalioti/homecv https://drive.google.com/file/d/1vIbW58JubsGucuZKLd4TFRp6bjLvuVQ1/view?usp=sharing Chalioti Lecturer Economic Theory Industrial Organization 451 College Str., Room 305 15393505 /sites/default/files/cv/Eva_Chalioti_Yale_Economics_CV_August_2022.pdf FAS By Appointment Only
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999
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999
Location
BCT CO31
Term Code
202203
Meeting Times
TTh 2.30-3.45
ECON 419 01
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This is an advanced course covers basic univariate and multivariate models and methods used to analyze financial and economic time series data and panel time series data. Topics include: classic linear models; serial dependence, autocorrelation in error variances (ARCH, GARCH); methods that allow for nonlinearity, tail dependence, comovements, conditional value at risk, fat-tails, nonstationarity; vector autoregressive models; factor models; Markov switching, latent factors, measurement errors, stochastic volatility; empirical asset pricing models. The aim of the course is to help students write their senior essays and start their own research in economics and finance.

Instructor(s)

Xiaohong Chen

Xiaohong Chen is the Malcolm K. Brachman Professor of Economics, Yale University. Previously Chen has taught at University of Chicago, London School of Economics and New York University. Chen got her PhD in Economics from University of California, San Diego.

Chen is an elected member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences since 2019, a fellow of the Econometric Society since 2007, a founding fellow of the International Association for Applied Econometrics since 2018, a fellow of the Journal of Econometrics since 2012, and an international fellow of Cemmap since 2007. Chen is a winner of the 2017 China Economics Prize. Chen has been a keynote or an invited speaker in many international conferences. She was the 2018 Sargan Lecturer of the Econometric Society, the 2019 Hilda Geiringer Lecturer, and the 2017 Econometric Theory lecturer.

Chen’s research field is econometrics. She is known for her research in penalized sieve estimation and inference on semiparametric and nonparametric models, such as semiparametric models of nonlinear time series, empirical asset pricing, copula, missing data, measurement error, nonparametric instrumental variables, semi/nonparametric conditional moment restrictions, causal inference.

Chen has published peer-reviewed papers in top-ranked general-purpose journals in economics: Econometrica and Review of Economic Studies; as well as in top-ranked journals in statistics and engineering: Annals of Statistics, Journal of the American Statistical Association, IEEE Tran Information Theory, IEEE Trans Neural Networks.


Chen also published several invited review chapters, including a chapter on the method of sieves in 2007 Handbook of Econometrics volumne 6B. She also won Econometric Theory Multa Scripsit Award in 2012, The Journal of Nonparametric Statistics 2010 Best Paper Award, The Richard Stone Prize in Journal of Applied Econometrics for the years 2008 and 2009, The Arnold Zellner Award for the best theory paper published in Journal of Econometrics in 2006 and 2007. Her PhD thesis was about stochastic approximation/Robbins-Monro procedure in function space for near-epoch dependent processes.

Chen is an editor of Journal of Econometrics since Jan 2019.
Chen was an associate editor of Econometrica, Review of Economic Studies, Quantitative Economics, Journal of Econometrics, Econometric Theory, Journal of Nonparametric Statistics, Econometrics Journal, and others.

Malcolm K. Brachman Professor of Economics and Professor of Management xiaohong.chen@yale.edu 203-432-5852 https://sites.google.com/site/xiaohongchenyale/ Chen Faculty Econometrics 451 College Street, room 402B 12462467 /sites/default/files/cv/chencv-latest-Yale-2022Aug.pdf FAS Friday, 4:30 - 6:00 pm
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999
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999
Location
HLH17 05
Term Code
202203
Meeting Times
TTh 1.00-2.15
ECON 424 01
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Introduction to the different roles and responsibilities of modern central banks, including the operation of payments systems, monetary policy, supervision and regulation, and financial stability. Discussion of different ways to structure central banks to best manage their responsibilities.

Instructor(s)

William English

Bill English joined Yale University in 2016, following a 25-year career at the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System. At the Board of Governors, he served as Director of the Division of Monetary Affairs and Secretary to the Federal Open Market Committee from 2010 to 2015. In that position, Bill oversaw the development of monetary policy, working extensively on issues related to asset purchases, policy normalization, and policy communication. His research has focused on issues related to monetary policy, including unconventional policy, and banking issues.

In 2002-03, Bill was a Senior Economist at the Bank for International Settlements, and in 1996-97, he was a Senior Economist at the Council of Economic Advisers. Prior to joining the Federal Reserve, Bill taught at the University of Pennsylvania, where he won the Irving Kravis Prize for Undergraduate Teaching in Economics.

Professor in the Practice of Finance william.b.english@yale.edu 203-432-5948 http://som.yale.edu/william-b-english English Affiliated Faculty Financial Economics Macroeconomics Evans Hall 4516 17119782 /sites/default/files/hendel-121108.pdf School Of Management
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999
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999
Term Code
202203
Meeting Times
MW 1.00-2.15
ECON 425 01
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A mathematically rigorous investigation of the interplay of economic theory and computer science, with an emphasis on the relationship of incentive-compatibility and algorithmic efficiency. Our main focus is on algorithmic tools in mechanism design, algorithms and complexity theory for learning and computing Nash and market equilibria, and the price of anarchy. Case studies in Web search auctions, wireless spectrum auctions, matching markets, and network routing, and social networks.

Instructor(s)

Yang Cai

Yang Cai is an Associate Professor (with Tenure) of Computer Science and Economics (secondary appointment) at Yale University. Prior to joining Yale, he was an Assistant Professor in the School of Computer Science at McGill University. He did his postdoc with Christos Papadimitriou at UC Berkeley. He finished his Ph.D. at MIT in Computer Science under the supervision of Costis Daskalakis and received his B.Sc. in EECS at Peking University. His research interests lie in theoretical computer science and its interface with economics, probability, learning and statistics. He has been honored with the Sloan Research Fellowship, the NSF CAREER Award, the William Dawson Scholarship, and the Simons-Berkeley Research Fellowship. His dissertation has been recognized by the George M. Sprowls Award (for best MIT doctoral theses in CS) and the SIGecom Doctoral Dissertation Award.

Associate Professor of Computer Science and Economics yang.cai@yale.edu http://www.cs.yale.edu/homes/cai/ Cai Affiliated Faculty Algorithms, Data, and Market Design 51 Prospect Street 17612697 FAS Other FAS and Academic Departments
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999
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999
Term Code
202203
Meeting Times
MW 2.30-3.45
1 HTBA WTS A60
ECON 432 01
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The course covers the history, science, sociology, statistics, and economic impacts of catastrophes, focusing on pandemics and climate change. The course ranges in content from humanistic through social sciences to epidemiology, and some parts are highly technical.

Term Code
202203
ECON 433 01
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The aim of this course is to analyze the ways that geography determines economic outcomes. We discuss and analyze data on regional economic activity and how economic shocks propagate in space. We pair those data with simple models where geography plays a crucial role in the determination of economic activity and discuss how changes in this geography lead some regions to grow and economic outcomes to diverge. Various policies that affect the spatial allocation of economic activity, such as infrastructure investment, local taxes, and transfers, are analyzed

Instructor(s)

Costas Arkolakis

  Ph.D., Economics, University of Minnesota M.A., Economics, University of Minnesota B.A., Economics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece Costas Arkolakis is a Professor of Economics at Yale University and an NBER Research Associate. He received his undergraduate degree from Aristotle University of Thessaloniki in Economics, and his Master and PhD in Economics from the University of Minnesota. He joined the department of Economics at Yale University in 2007, became an Associate Professor in 2013, Henry Kohn Associate Professor in 2014, and a Full Professor in 2018. He has been awarded four National Science Foundation grants including an NSF CAREER grant, the Bodossaki Foundation Prize in Social Sciences for distinguished young Greek scientists, and published in a variety of journals (including the Journal of Political Economy, American Economic Review, Quarterly Journal of Economics, Review of Economic Studies). He is a co-editor of Economic Theory and the Journal of International Economics. His research and teaching specialize in general equilibrium trade theory, spatial economics, macroeconomics and industrial organization.

Professor of Economics costas.arkolakis@yale.edu 203-432-3527 http://www.arkolakis.com http://arkolakis.com/cv Arkolakis Faculty International Trade Macroeconomics Spatial Economics 451 College Street, room 202 12597073 FAS Monday/Wednesday 10:30-11:30 am ET
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999
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999
Location
WLH 117
Term Code
202203
Meeting Times
MW 9.00-10.15
ECON 438 01
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This course has an applied econometrics focus. Topics include voting behavior, betting markets, and various issues in sports. The aim of the course is to help students prepare original empirical research using econometric tools and to read empirical papers in economics and other social sciences. Students write three empirical papers. The first can be an extension of an existing article, where some of the results are duplicated and then extended. The second is similar to the first with no example provided. The third is an original paper within the range of topics covered in the course, where data are collected and analyzed using relevant econometric techniques.

Instructor(s)

Ray C. Fair

Ray C. Fair is the John M. Musser Professor of Economics at Yale University. He previously was at Princeton University and served as a visiting associate professor at M.I.T. He is a fellow of the Econometric Society.

Fair’s main research is in macroeconometrics, but he has also done work in the areas of finance, voting behavior, and aging in sports. He has made quarterly updates of his U.S. macroeconometric model and made forecasts since 1983. He has made four-year updates of his presidential vote share equation and made forecasts since 1980. He has estimated how fast people should slow down as they age if they remain in peak shape. His current research includes estimating the costs of contact in college and high school sports and in examining the history of infrastructure. People can use his website to estimate how fast they should be declining as they age. One can also compute predictions of U.S. presidential and congressional elections. And one can work on line with his macroeconometric models. The website is: https://fairmodel.econ.yale.edu/.

Ph.D. Economics, M.I.T., February 1968
B.A. Economics, Fresno State College, June 1964

 

John M. Musser Professor of Economics and Professor of Management ray.fair@yale.edu 203-980-0646 http://fairmodel.econ.yale.edu/ https://fairmodel.econ.yale.edu/rayfair/vitae3.pdf Fair Faculty Econometrics Financial Economics International Finance International Trade Macroeconomics Political Economy 451 College Street, room 201 10466038 FAS Wednesdays 2:30 - 3:30 pm or by appointment
Research Staff
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999
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999
Location
WLH 113
Term Code
202203
Meeting Times
MW 1.00-2.15
ECON 444 01
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The role of hedge funds in the United States financial markets and hedge fund behavior; understanding what hedge funds do, why they exist, and how they are different from other investment vehicles. Study of investment strategies that provide opportunity and risk for investors and study of academic papers analyzing (risky) arbitrage strategies.

Instructor(s)
Location
HLH17 03
Term Code
202203
Meeting Times
MW 11.35-12.50
ECON 449 01
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In this course we apply microeconomic techniques, theoretical and empirical, to the analysis of internal violent conflict, including civil wars, terrorism and insurgencies, its causes and consequences. Topics include forced migration, ethnic conflict, long-term consequences of war and individual choices to participate in violence. Readings comprise frontier research papers and students will learn to critically engage with cutting-edge research designs.

Instructor(s)

Gerard Padro

Gerard Padro i Miquel is a Professor of Economics and Political Science at Yale University, where he is also the Director of the Leitner Program of International and Comparative Political Economy. He is interested in the interplay between politics and economics as a barrier for development with a focus on civil conflict and on the politics of non-democratic regimes. His previous work has been published at the Quarterly Journal of Economics, American Economic Review, Review of Economic Studies and the Quarterly Journal of Political Science among others.

Professor of Economics and Political Science gerard.padroimiquel@yale.edu +1 (203) 432-5011 https://www.gerardpadro.com/ Padro Faculty Development Economics Political Economy Rosenkranz Hall, room 335 17502112 /sites/default/files/cv/GERARD%20PADR%C3%93%20i%20MIQUEL%20CV.pdf FAS Other FAS and Academic Departments Wednesday, 1:30-2:30 pm
Padró i Miquel, Gerard headshot
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999
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999
Location
AKW 100
Term Code
202203
Meeting Times
W 9.25-11.15
ECON 451 01
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In recent years, cryptocurrencies and blockchains have seen broad experimentation and adoption across many areas in the modern economy. However, the foundations of blockchains can be traced back to many classical results in the study of incentives and distributed systems, such as in economics, cryptography, and computer science. This seminar aims to introduce students to the theoretical underpinning of blockchain technology and help develop skills in economic analysis. We cover the related literature and more recent developments and applications such as Bitcoin, decentralized exchanges, and smart contracts. We explore this novel field through the lens of mechanism design, i.e., aligning the incentives of strategic agents to induce desirable outcomes in an economic system.

Instructor(s)
Location
HQ 227
Term Code
202203
Meeting Times
W 3.30-5.20
ECON 456 01
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A case-oriented study of principal issues and investment types found in substantial private equity portfolios. Discussion of enterprise valuation, value creation, business economics, negotiation, and legal structure, based on primary source materials and original cases.

Instructor(s)
Location
WTS B52
Term Code
202203
Meeting Times
TTh 2.30-3.45
ECON 467 01
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Economic evolution and prospects of the Latin American and Caribbean (LAC) countries. Topics include the period from independence to the 1930s; import substitution and industrialization to the early 1980s; the debt crisis and the "lost decade"; reform and disappointment in the late 1980s and the 1990s; exploration of selected episodes in particular countries; and speculations about the future.

Location
LUCE 202
Term Code
202203
Meeting Times
M 9.25-11.15
ECON 472 01
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This course studies the economics of innovation and the effects of artificial intelligence on different industries. Topics include economics of the intellectual property (IP) protection system; strategic choices in innovation and competition; patent races; measurement and big data; the sharing and digitalized economy; collective intelligence and decisions; online auctions; venture capital; legal and social infrastructure.

Instructor(s)

Evangelia Chalioti

Evangelia Chalioti is a Senior Lecturer and Associate Chair at the Department of Economics of Yale University. She received her PhD degree in Economics from the Athens University of Economics and Business. Her research revolves around competition, markets and innovation. She studies the Economics of Artificial Intelligence and how cutting-edge technologies transform business. Her research focuses on analyzing the effects of risk and the diffusion of scientific knowledge on firms’ incentives to innovate and compete. She also examines the conditions under which workers help or sabotage their colleagues in their attempt to build up their own reputation.

Senior Lecturer evangelia.chalioti@yale.edu 203-432-3727 https://sites.google.com/view/evachalioti/homecv https://drive.google.com/file/d/1vIbW58JubsGucuZKLd4TFRp6bjLvuVQ1/view?usp=sharing Chalioti Lecturer Economic Theory Industrial Organization 451 College Str., Room 305 15393505 /sites/default/files/cv/Eva_Chalioti_Yale_Economics_CV_August_2022.pdf FAS By Appointment Only
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999
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999
Location
WLH 112
Term Code
202203
Meeting Times
M 1.30-3.20
ECON 475 01
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How law and economic theory define and conceptualize economic discrimination; whether economic models adequately describe behaviors of discriminators as documented in court cases and government hearings; the extent to which economic theory and econometric techniques aid our understanding of actual marketplace discrimination.

Instructor(s)

Gerald Jaynes

Gerald D. Jaynes is professor in the department of Economics and the department of African American Studies at Yale University.  He earned the doctorate in economics from the University of Illinois at Champaign-Urbana, 1976. In addition to his teaching and research duties as a professor at Yale, he has served as a legislative aid to State Senator Cecil A. Partee, President Pro-tem of the Illinois State Senate, 1971-72; assistant Professor of Economics at the University of Pennsylvania, and chaired Yale’s Department of African and African American Studies, 1990-1996. He has served in many public capacities such as Study Director of the Committee On The Status of Black Americans at the National Research Council of the National Academy of Sciences in Washington D.C., 1985-89; Chairman of the New Haven, CT. Minority Business Development Agency by Mayoral appointment, 1982-84; the Mayor’s Blue-Ribbon Committee For the Redevelopment of New Haven, 1990; Member, Board of Economists, Black Enterprise Magazine, Fellow, Joint Center For Political and Economic Studies; Member Council of Economic Advisors to the National Urban League. He has testified before the United States Congress on numerous occasions and served as a consultant to federal and local government agencies. He is recognized as an expert on race relations and the economic conditions of African Americans, and has lectured and spoken on these topics at many universities and forums around the world.  His research has been cited internationally within forums such as legislative bodies and courts including the United States Supreme Court. He has appeared on radio and television shows, including The NBC Today Show and The Bill Moyers’ Show. Listed in Who’s Who Among African Americans since 1989, he has written extensively for scholarly journals, books and popular essays.  Among his more notable publications are: A Common Destiny: Blacks and American Society, 1989; Branches Without Roots: Genesis of the Black Working Class in the American South, 1986; Immigration and Race: New Challenges for American Democracy, 2000; The Encyclopedia of African American Society, 2004.

A. Whitney Griswold Professor of Economics, African American Studies, and Urban Studies gerald.jaynes@yale.edu 203-432-3586 Jaynes Faculty Economic History Public Economics 451 College Street 10399398 FAS By Appointment Only
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999
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999
Location
HQ 401
Term Code
202203
Meeting Times
T 9.25-11.15
ECON 480 01
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Focus on systemic risk, banking crises, financial stability and macroprudential policies. Additional emphasis on systemic risk and prudential policies in peripheral European economies and emerging economies.

Instructor(s)
Term Code
202203
Meeting Times
M 9.25-11.15
1 HTBA WALL81 401
ECON 491 01
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Senior essays are an opportunity for students to engage in independent, original economic research. Essays are not reviews of the literature, rather each should be an examination of a hypothesis using the tools of economics. In particular, the essay must contain original research and/or analysis. They can be theoretical, empirical or computational. The senior essays that receive A's and are awarded prizes are typically those that use economics tools (and, where appropriate, data) to offer fresh insights on questions. 

Students enrolling in this one-term course need to find an advisor. There are no page requirements or formatting requirements. Generally, essays run about 30 pages. Advice regarding bibliographies, graphs, etc. should be given by your advisor. 

Instructor(s)

Rebecca Toseland

Rebecca Toseland is a Senior Lecturer in the Department of Economics and the Director of Research Support in the Tobin Center for Economic Policy at Yale University. Previously, she was a Research Scholar at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research (SIEPR) and a Lecturer in the Department of Economics at Harvard University. Her research and teaching interests span a variety of domestic policy issues including economic mobility, education, housing, health, and the environment. She received a B.A. in Economics and Environmental Studies from Yale University, and both an M.A. in Ecology, Evolution and Marine Biology and a Ph.D. in Economics from the University of California, Santa Barbara.

Senior Lecturer, Director of Research Support Tobin Center for Economic Policy rebecca.toseland@yale.edu Toseland Lecturer Environmental Economics Labor Economics Public Economics 77 Prospect St, Room C-325 11733048 FAS Other FAS and Academic Departments By Appointment Only
A headshot of Rebecca Toseland
Team
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Giovanni Maggi

Working Papers

Giovanni Maggi received a B.A. degree from Bocconi University, Milan, and a PhD in Economics from Stanford University. He has been at Yale since 2007. His current research focuses on international agreements on regulatory and environmental policies.

Howard H. Leach Professor of Economics, Professor of Management, Director of Undergraduate Studies giovanni.maggi@yale.edu Maggi FacultyLeadership International Trade Political Economy 115 Prospect St., Room 334 12583065 /sites/default/files/cv/Giovanni_Maggi_CV.pdf FAS Tue 1:15-2:45 (in person)
Research Staff
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999
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Location
1 HTBA
Term Code
202203
Meeting Times
1 HTBA
ECON 498 01
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Description

Junior and senior economics majors desiring a directed reading course in special topics in economics not covered in other graduate or undergraduate courses may elect this course, not more than once, with written permission of the director of undergraduate studies and of the instructor. The instructor meets with the student regularly, typically for an hour a week, and the student writes a paper or a series of short essays. Junior and senior majors may take this course for a letter grade, but it does not meet the requirement for a department seminar.

Term Code
202203
ECON 498 02
More Details
Description

Junior and senior economics majors desiring a directed reading course in special topics in economics not covered in other graduate or undergraduate courses may elect this course, not more than once, with written permission of the director of undergraduate studies and of the instructor. The instructor meets with the student regularly, typically for an hour a week, and the student writes a paper or a series of short essays. Junior and senior majors may take this course for a letter grade, but it does not meet the requirement for a department seminar.

Instructor(s)

Giovanni Maggi

Working Papers

Giovanni Maggi received a B.A. degree from Bocconi University, Milan, and a PhD in Economics from Stanford University. He has been at Yale since 2007. His current research focuses on international agreements on regulatory and environmental policies.

Howard H. Leach Professor of Economics, Professor of Management, Director of Undergraduate Studies giovanni.maggi@yale.edu Maggi FacultyLeadership International Trade Political Economy 115 Prospect St., Room 334 12583065 /sites/default/files/cv/Giovanni_Maggi_CV.pdf FAS Tue 1:15-2:45 (in person)
Research Staff
Sort Order Department
999
Sort Order Cowles
999
Location
1 HTBA
Term Code
202203
Meeting Times
1 HTBA